Been lucky to play with great drummers. Lucid Nation’s drummers, in order of appearance.  No Spinal Tap jokes please.  Debbie Haliday, Erin McCarley, Tia Sprocket, Patty Schemel, LaFrae Sci, Ken Schalk, Rob Cournoyer, Denise Saffren, Dave Greene~

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Ronnie Pontiac of Lucid Nation @ Terrazza Jamay, Virgin Mega Hollywood, Big Scary Tree, Jabberjaw, and rehearsals~

I was at this show!  Macondo Cultural Center is where riot grrrl happened to me.  The tagger who worked the door always tagged my hand “gloze.” Gloze was Lucid Nation’s original name but only for a few weeks. RIP Gabriel Garcia Marquez~

I was at this show!  Macondo Cultural Center is where riot grrrl happened to me.  The tagger who worked the door always tagged my hand “gloze.” Gloze was Lucid Nation’s original name but only for a few weeks. RIP Gabriel Garcia Marquez~

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Our little documentary about Zona Norte, the hell where so many deportees die, a film that was so dangerous and painful to make, had found a champion.  Edward James Olmos presents: Exile Nation the Plastic People.  Director Charles Shaw and Mr. Olmos after their first meeting.

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Alien She shows that riot grrrl’s feminist messages are still urgent, present, and with us. On a central wall within the exhibition we hung a banner with text from one of the riot grrrl manifestos circa 1992—and the message still resonates today. It ends with:

"BECAUSE every time we pick up a pen, or an instrument, or get anything done, we are creating the revolution. We ARE the revolution."

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A reading room sits at the exhibition’s physical and philosophical heart with walls outlined in a menagerie of zines and posters with a large table placed in the center. Set inside the table’s top are Joseph Cornell-like boxes that contain ephemera: cassettes, playlists, and flyers. Each box corresponds to a curated playlist of songs from riot grrrl bands that can be listened to on mp3 players. I was particularly taken with a note in one box that politely reads, “Sorry, there will be no master race or gender on this planet.” This sanction of the gallery, ideally a space for reflection and communication, provides an overview to riot grrrl’s many concerns and accurately illustrates the movement’s turn away from the privileges inherent in second-wave feminism and the misogyny of punk culture. Giving a second life to punk music and its collage aesthetic, riot grrrl mixed music culture with activism and academia. Its collective wasn’t merely talented and angry, they were smart and ready to achieve definitive change.

Riot grrrl flyer c. 1996, you’d see them at shows or mailed in envelopes with zines.

Riot grrrl flyer c. 1996, you’d see them at shows or mailed in envelopes with zines.

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