Could’ve given a million dollars to 100 worthy unknowns. Gave 100m to rich men everybody already knows about.

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wordsnquotes:

AUTHOR OF THE DAY: Virginia Woolf
Virginia Woolf was born on January 25, 1882 in London, England. Born into a privilege household filled with free-thinkers, Woolf was able to develop her talent from an early age. 
Growing up in an intellectually and artistically well-connected family, Woolf was allowed to hone her writing skills when she first created a family newspaper, the Hyde Park Gate News in her childhood. Woolf was known for being extremely light-hearted and playful and recorded family anecdotes in her newspaper. 
Although Woolf was a happy child, she experienced a dark period at the age of 6, when she was sexually abused by her half-brothers. This traumatic event was deepened by the sudden death of her mother at the age of 49, which propelled her into a nervous breakdown. Two years later her half-sister passed away, which added to her depression. 
Despite her despair, Woolf intellectually fed herself by taking courses in German, Greek and Latin at the Ladies’ Department of King’s College London. Then in 1904 her father passed away, which pushed her to be institutionalized. This pattern between literary exploration and personal desperation and despair reigned in her lifetime. 
Although bouts of depression and severe mood swings plagued Woolf, her literary career soared. She was famous for playing with several literary devices, such as dream-like scenes, free form prose, complicated plot lines and unusual narrative point of views. By her mid-forties, Woolf had established herself as a household name. She habitually spoke in several colleges and wrote compelling essays and self-published short stories.
Woolf was able to find love with a man named, Leonard; they remained sweethearts for life. He was extremely aware and supportive of Woolf’s internal conflict. While working on Between the Acts, Leonard noticed her inevitable demise. During this time their home was destroyed in London during the Blitz. Leonard, a Jewish man, was in danger of being captured by the Nazis. This detrimental fact pushed Woolf into her suicide. On March 28, 1941, Woolf filled the pocket’s of her overcoat with stones and walked out into the River Ouse, where the stream took her. In her last note to her loving husband she wrote:

"Dearest, I feel certain that I am going mad again. I feel we can’t go through another of those terrible times. And I shan’t recover this time. I begin to hear voices, and I can’t concentrate. So I am doing what seems the best thing to do. You have given me the greatest possible happiness. You have been in every way all that anyone could be. I don’t think two people could have been happier till this terrible disease came. I can’t fight any longer. I know that I am spoiling your life, that without me you could work. And you will I know. You see I can’t even write this properly. I can’t read. What I want to say is I owe all the happiness of my life to you. You have been entirely patient with me and incredibly good. I want to say that—everybody knows it. If anybody could have saved me it would have been you. Everything has gone from me but the certainty of your goodness. I can’t go on spoiling your life any longer. I don’t think two people could have been happier than we have been. V."

After World War II, her popularity declined, but surged in the 1970s, during the feminist movement. Regardless of Virginia Woolf’s demons she is one of the most influential authors of the 21st century. 
NOTABLE WORKS
Mrs. Dalloway (1925)
To the Lighthouse (1927)
Orlando (1928)
A Room of One’s Own (1929)
The Waves (1931)
Read excerpts by Virginia Woolf here! Get her books here! 

wordsnquotes:

AUTHOR OF THE DAY: Virginia Woolf

Virginia Woolf was born on January 25, 1882 in London, England. Born into a privilege household filled with free-thinkers, Woolf was able to develop her talent from an early age. 

Growing up in an intellectually and artistically well-connected family, Woolf was allowed to hone her writing skills when she first created a family newspaper, the Hyde Park Gate News in her childhood. Woolf was known for being extremely light-hearted and playful and recorded family anecdotes in her newspaper. 

Although Woolf was a happy child, she experienced a dark period at the age of 6, when she was sexually abused by her half-brothers. This traumatic event was deepened by the sudden death of her mother at the age of 49, which propelled her into a nervous breakdown. Two years later her half-sister passed away, which added to her depression. 

Despite her despair, Woolf intellectually fed herself by taking courses in German, Greek and Latin at the Ladies’ Department of King’s College London. Then in 1904 her father passed away, which pushed her to be institutionalized. This pattern between literary exploration and personal desperation and despair reigned in her lifetime. 

Although bouts of depression and severe mood swings plagued Woolf, her literary career soared. She was famous for playing with several literary devices, such as dream-like scenes, free form prose, complicated plot lines and unusual narrative point of views. By her mid-forties, Woolf had established herself as a household name. She habitually spoke in several colleges and wrote compelling essays and self-published short stories.

Woolf was able to find love with a man named, Leonard; they remained sweethearts for life. He was extremely aware and supportive of Woolf’s internal conflict. While working on Between the Acts, Leonard noticed her inevitable demise. During this time their home was destroyed in London during the Blitz. Leonard, a Jewish man, was in danger of being captured by the Nazis. This detrimental fact pushed Woolf into her suicide. On March 28, 1941, Woolf filled the pocket’s of her overcoat with stones and walked out into the River Ouse, where the stream took her. In her last note to her loving husband she wrote:

"Dearest, I feel certain that I am going mad again. I feel we can’t go through another of those terrible times. And I shan’t recover this time. I begin to hear voices, and I can’t concentrate. So I am doing what seems the best thing to do. You have given me the greatest possible happiness. You have been in every way all that anyone could be. I don’t think two people could have been happier till this terrible disease came. I can’t fight any longer. I know that I am spoiling your life, that without me you could work. And you will I know. You see I can’t even write this properly. I can’t read. What I want to say is I owe all the happiness of my life to you. You have been entirely patient with me and incredibly good. I want to say that—everybody knows it. If anybody could have saved me it would have been you. Everything has gone from me but the certainty of your goodness. I can’t go on spoiling your life any longer. I don’t think two people could have been happier than we have been. V."

After World War II, her popularity declined, but surged in the 1970s, during the feminist movement. Regardless of Virginia Woolf’s demons she is one of the most influential authors of the 21st century. 

NOTABLE WORKS

Mrs. Dalloway (1925)

To the Lighthouse (1927)

Orlando (1928)

A Room of One’s Own (1929)

The Waves (1931)

Read excerpts by Virginia Woolf here! Get her books here

1,233 notes

9/11 = 13 years of war and still counting

Fall

Sometimes so obvious
mostly slow and devious
standing out at the corner
silence over your shoulder
you turn as if you heard a sound

Everything’s falling down

Who tore down that last nest
to put up toxic boxes
idolizing the obnoxious
we cursed ourselves for being cautious
some kind of primal dissatisfaction
rules our every action

Everything’s falling down

All our hopes are drowned
we lost what we found
drifting like litter downtown
they sold us by the pound
and as our springs unwound
we let ourselves be bound
to superstitious undergrounds
and when our vanities went uncrowned
we didn’t make a sound
when the rustlers came to town
now it’s just a ghost town
in every direction all around

Everything’s falling down

Tamra Spivey: vocals
Ronnie Pontiac: guitar
Greta Brinkman: bass
Diane Naegel: synth
Patty Schemel: drums
Larry Schemel: guitar
Kayla Tabb: percussion
Recorded and mixed by Wes Weresch
assisted by Dawn Pfund
at Uptone, Tacoma WA
mastered by Jack Endino

video by Darren Carter

Mixing on this record ended 9/10/2001

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Quinn’s screencaps tell us nothing we didn’t already know about the dynamic that exists between 4chan, the gaming community, and the women who attempt to participate in it. But it does provide ample evidence that 4chan and other gamers have no leg to stand on when they try to claim that GamerGate is about something other than a sustained attempt to drive feminists out of the gaming community.

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interviews for GRRRL! feature length documentary booked all the way through November, including Corin Tucker, Jody Bleyle, Patty Schemel, and so many others we’re excited about. Meanwhile here’s the documentary short version that’s been traveling with the Alien She art exhibit, and it screened at a bunch of festivals~

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unashamedlyfeminist:

Submissions:
Parallel Magazine will be open for submissions shortly. Please check back soon.

Features:
We are currently looking to talk to/feature/review the following people/groups/events:

  • Female bands/musicians and/or upcoming album releases/gigs
  • Female art…

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I could be demure like
girls who are soft for
boys who are fearful of
getting an earful
but i gotta rock!
Sleater-Kinney

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Are you or were you involved in riot grrrl L.A. then or now? IF you aren’t already in touch with film director Vega Darling please get in touch with me as interviews for the feature length of GRRRL! are being scheduled now~

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